A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



Da

"The." [DV] Mostly from Black Vernacular, as in "Dats da bomb!"


Daemon

"God, Goddess, Deity, Divine Power." From the Greek word of the same meaning through the Late Latin "daemon." At one time both Latin forms, "demon" and "daemon" refered to "minions of the Devil," but "daemon" has been gaining back its original origin.


Daemonic

"Demonic." See "daemon," "demon" and "demonic."


Daff

"A Simpleton, Idiot." From the Middle English "daffe," from "daft." See "daft."


Daft

"Of Low Intelligence, Stupid; Of Unsound Mind, Deranged." From the Middle English "daft," from the Anglo-Saxon "gedæft," meaning "meek," "mild" and "gentle" as well as the modern sense of "daft." See also "daff."


Dago

A racist slur. A corruption of "Diego," a common Spanish name. It was originally leveled at Spanish people but was broadened to include all the Latin peoples.


Dahling

"Darling." Formed in imitation of upper-class or "uppity" pronunciation.


Dangleberry

A late variant of "dingleberry," influenced by "dangle." See "dingleberry."


Damage

"Cost, Price." Originally from "damage to the wallet" or "damage to the pocketbook."


DAMHIK

"Don't Ask Me How I Know." An internet abbreviation.


DARFC

"Ducking And Running For Cover." An internet abbreviation.


Dark

1. "Void of Light; Reflecting Little Light." This word has various Middle English forms, such as "darce," "dorcke," "deork," "darc," "dirk," "dorc" and "deorc," which was how it appeared in Anglo-Saxon. It does not appear to be good Germanic, and has no cognates outside English.


Dark

2. "An Absence of Light, Darkness." This meaning only goes back to Middle English, but is not attested in Anglo-Saxon. The forms of "darkness" are older.


Darken

"To Grow Dark, Become Dark; Make Dark." A look at the variants of "dark in Middle English will show the potential for variant forms. The Anglo-Saxon form was "deorcian" = "to grow dim."


Darkness

"An Absence of Light." While there are a multitude of Middle English forms, this goes back to the Anglo-Saxon "deorcnes."


Darky, Darkey, Darkie

A racist pejorative used against Blacks, from "dark of skin."


Das'

"That Is." [DV][Cont] Primarily from Black Vernacular. Contracted from "dat is," i.e., "Das' phat, yo! " See also "dats."


Dastard

"Coward; Dullard." Middle English, probably from the Old Norse "dæstr" = "weary."


Dastardly

"Cowardly." From "dastard." See "dastard."


Dat

"That." [DV] Mostly from Black Vernacular.


Dats

"Thats." [DV][Cont] Mostly from Black Vernacular, as seen written: "dats all for now." See also "das'."


Dayum

"Damn." [DV] Phoneticism from the Southern pronunciation principle of splitting vowels sounds.


DDF

"Drug and Disease Free." From single's ad terminology.


D/D-Free

"Drug and Disease Free." From single's ad terminology.


De

"The." [DV] A Jamaican version of "da." For example, "De Jamaican Shop" in Lauderhill Florida.


Dead Presidents, Dead Prezidents, Dead Prez, etc.

"Money." Primarily from Black V ernacular. Named, of course, after those whose portraits appear on our paper money.


Deaf

"Hard of Hearing, Incapable of Hearing." This word is unchanged Anglo-Saxon, though the Anglo-Saxon word also carried the meanings of "empty" and "barren."


Deck

"To Knock Someone Down." From the idea of making one "hit the deck," the "deck" being the floor.


Deep-Six

"Kill." From the practice of burying dead bodies six feet under the ground.


Deez

"These." [DV]


Dem

"Them." [DV]


Demon

"Evil Spirit." From the the Medieval Latin "demon" and further from the Late Latin "daemon," both = "evil spirit." The Latin comes from the Greek "daimon" = "god, goddess, deity, divine power." Christianity "demonized" this particular word, turning the pagan gods and spirits to "minions of the Devil." See "daemon."


Demoness

"A Female Demon." See "demon."


Demonette

"A Little Demon." See "demon."


Demoniac

"One Possessed by Demons." This also functions as an archaic form of "demonic." From the Middle English "demoniak," from the Old French "demoniaque." Ultimately from the Greek daimonikos/daimonakos" = "possessed by or under the control of a daimon." See "demon."


Demoniacal

"Demonic." See "demoniac," "demonic" and "demon."


Demoniacally

"In a Demonic Manner." See "demoniac," "demonic" and "demon."


Demoniacism

"The State of Being Demoniacal." See "demonical" and "demon."


Demonial

"Demonic." A rare form, see "demonic" and "demon."


Demoniality

"The Nature of Demons; Demons Collectively." See "demon."


Demonian

"Characteristic or Pertaining to a Demon." See "demon."


Demonianism

"The State of Being Possessed by a Demon." See "demonian" and "demon."


Demoniast

"One Who Has Dealings With Demons." See "demon."


Demonic

"Of or Like a Demon, Inspired, Possessed." From the Greek "daimonikos/daimonakos" = "possessed by or under the control of a daimon." See "demon."


Demonifuge

"Apotropaic, Used Against Demons." See "demon."


Demonism

"The Belief in Demons; Demonolatry." See "demon."


Demonize

"To Put Under the Sway of Demons; to Make Demonic." From the Late Latin "demonizare" = "to make demoniac." See "-ize."


Demonocracy

"The Rule of Demons." From the Greek words "daimon" = "god, goddess, deity, divine power" and "krateo" = "To rule, hold sway."


Demonographer

"One Versed in Demonology." From the French "demonographe" = "demonologist." See "demon" and "demonologist." See below.


Demonography

"Demonology; Written Works on Demonology." From the French "demonographie" = "demonology." The word is a combination of the Greek roots "daimon" (see "demon") and "grapho" = "express in written characters."


Demonolator

"One Who Worships Demons." See "demonolatry" below.


Demonolatry

"The Worship of Demons." The word is a combination of the Greek roots "daimon" (see "demon") and "latreia" = "service to the gods, divine worship."


Demonologer

"One Versed in Demonology." An archaic form of "demonologist." See "demonologist."


Demonologist

"One Versed in Demonology." See "demonology."


Demonologic

"Pertaining to Demonology." See "demonology."


Demonological

"Pertaining to Demonology." See "demonology."


Demonology

"The Study of Demons." The word is a combination of the Greek roots "daimon" and "logos" See "demon" and "-ology."


Demonomachy

"Fighting with a Demon." Probably from the Greek "daemonomaxeo" = "fight against heaven." See "demon."


Demonomagy

"Magic or Sorcery Using Demons." A combination of the words "demon" and "magic." See "demon."


Demonomancy

"Divination with the Aid of Demons." The word is a combination of the Greek roots "daimon" (see "demon") and "manteia" = "mode of divination."


Demonomania

"Pathological Fear of Demons." From the French "demonomanie" with the same meaning. See "demon" and "mania."


Demonomist

"One Who Lives Subjected to Evil or Demonic Influence." The word is a combination of the Greek roots "daimon" (see "demon") and "nomos" = "law."


Demonomy

"The Dominion of Demons." An archaic word, see "demonomist."


Demonopathy

"Demonomania." The word is a combination of the Greek roots "daimon" (see "demon") and "pathos" = "emotion, passion."


Demonophobia

"An Irrational Fear of Demons and Spirits." See "demon" and "-phobia."


Demonry

"Demoniacal Influence or Practice." See "demon" and "demoniacal."


Demonship

"The Rank or Condition of a Demon." See "demon."


Dendral

"Pertaining to Trees, of the Nature of a Tree, Arboreal." See "dendro-" and "-al."


Dendrite

"A Natural Formation or Marking Resembling a Tree or a Stone or Mineral with Such a Marking; A Branched Crystalline Growth." See "dendro-" and "-ite."


Dendritic

"Of Branched Form; Resembling a Dendrite; Having Arborescent Markings." See "dendro-," "-ite" and "ic." See also "dendrite."


Dendro-

"Pertaining to Trees." A Combining form, This takes the form of "dendro-" before a consonant and "dendr-" before a vowel. It derives from the Greek "dendr-" and "dendro-," combining forms of dendreon or dendron = "tree." The second part of the Greek is apparently derived from the zero-grade form of the PIE root *deru = "tree," similar to our "tree." See also "-dendron."


Dendrography

"The Description of Trees." See "dendro-" and "-graphy."


Dendroid

"Of the Form of a Tree, Dendritic, Arborescent." See "dendro-" and "-oid."


Dendroidal

"Of the Form of a Tree, Dendritic, Arborescent." See "dendroid" and "-al."


Dendrolatry

"The Worship of Trees." From two Greek components, the combining form dendro- (See "dendro-") and "latreia" = "service to the gods, divine worship."


Dendrolite

"A Fossilized Tree or Part of a Tree." See "dendro-" and "-lite."


Dendrology

"The Study of Trees." See "dendro-" and "-ology."


-dendron

"Tree." A combining form in botanical designations, from the Greek dendreon or dendron = "tree." See also "dendro-." This can be seen, for instance, in the genus names Toxicodendron = "poison tree" (which includes poison ivy, poison sumac and poison oak), Rhododendron = "rose tree," Philodendron = "loving trees" and Liriodendron = "tulip tree."


Dendrophilous

"Tree Loving." See "dendro-" and "-philia."


Dendrophobia

"An Irrational Fear of Trees." See "dendro-" and "-phobia."


Dere

"There." [DV]


Deuce

"Two." From Black Vernacular, as in "Gimme deuce."


Deuterogamist

"One Who Remarries After the Death of His First Wife." Derived from the Greek "deuter" = "second" and "gamos" = "marriage." See "gamic."


Dey

1. "They." [DV] A common slang corruption, as in "Dey got it go'n on."


Dey

2. "Their." [DV] As in "Talk dey ear off."


Di

"The." [DV] Particularly Jamaican, as in the Reggae song title "Yuh a di #1."


Dig

"Understand." From Jazz lingo, suppossedly derived from an African word (Lang. uncertain) "degan" = "to understand, a call to attention."


Digamy

"A Second Legal Marriage After the Death or Divorce of a First Spouse." From the Greek roots "di" = "two" and "gamos" = "marriage." See "gamic."


Dildo

"An Artificial Phallus; Sexually Penetrate with a Dildo." Also seen in early occurrences as "dildoe" or "dill-doe." The word is usually used to denote an artificial phallus for use in sexplay. The OED traces it with this meaning back to at least 1610. The word has also been used to describe the phallic lingam statues of Hindu religious art. Only slightly later than the primary sense, we see the word used to describe long, cylindrical objects, such as a "dildo bush" and a "dildo glass." The etymology of the word is quite murky. The Italian "diletto" = "delight" has been proposed but this seems a mere guess with little to support it. As noted in the definitions, the word also has a verb form, which is commonly seen in pornographic contexts. It is most commonly seen in the past tense, as in "horny wench gets licked and dildoed," "beautiful slave gagged, blindfolded and dildoed!!!" and "each of them crying out to be dildoed." (amusingly, the first two of these show up repeatedly, even excessively, on the first few pages of a Google search for the word.) There is also a gerund form, "dildoing," as seen in "cross dressing, enforced dildoing, and spanking" and "showing her hairy pussy and then dildoing it."


Dillberry

A shortened variant of "dingleberry." See "dingleberry."


Dillio, Dilly

"Deal." This is a contraction of "Deal, Yo," from the phrase "What's the deal, yo?" shortened to "What's the dillio?"


Dime

1. "Ten." From Black Vernacular with a heavy crossover into drug slang, after the dime as a ten cent piece. See "dime bag" and "nickel."


Dime

2. "A Perfect 10." From Black Vernacular. While there is an apparent similarity to "dame," the word "dime" actually has a different origin. A "dime" is a woman that rates a 10 on the scale of 1 to 10. For example: "an absolutely delectable fair skinned dime." One might compare to the title of the porn mag "Perfect 10." See "dime" 1 and also "dyme."


Dime

3. "To Rat On, Tell On, Call the Authorities On." See "dime out."


Dime Bag

"Ten Dollars Worth of Drugs." See "dime" 1.


Dime Out

"To Rat On, Tell On, Call the Authorities On." Sometimes simply "to dime" or "to dime on." From the dime it used to take to use a payphone.


Dingleberry

"A Piece of Feces Stuck to Anal Hairs." While this is now generally applied to crap on human anuses, it was originally applied to the same on farm animals. The word's etymology seems rarely attempted, but it seems pretty straight-foreward. "Berry" has changed little throughout the Germanic family and given the context, we can be quite certain that it is meant literally. It is, literally, a berry of "dung." Compare with the Middle English form "dinge" and we see there can be little room for uncertainty. See "dung" and "dingy." The word has also developed pejorative use, as calling one a "stupid dingleberry" is the same as calling one a "stupid shit."


Dingy

"Dirty; Coloured as if Dirty; Crappy." First recorded in the Kentish dialect in the early half of the 18th century, derived from the Middle English "dinge" = "dung." See "dung."


Dip

"Drunkard; Idiot, Dope." [Cont.] A shortened form of "dipso." It first meant simply "alcoholic" and later also came to mean "a person stupid as if drunk." See "dipso" and "dipsomania."


Dippy

"Foolish or Idiotic as if Drunk." From "dipsy." See "dipsy."


Dipsetic

"Causing Thirst; Something that Causes Thirst." An adaptation of the Greek "dipsitikos" = "causing thirst." It is first attested in the middle of the nineteenth century.


Dipshit

"Idiot, Dope; Stupid." A corrupted version of "dipso." See "dipso."


Dipso

"Drunkard, Lush." [Cont.] A shortened form of "dipsomaniac." It is first attested in the early twentieth century. See "dipsomaniac."


Dipsomania

"Alcoholism, a Craving for Alcohol." A Pseudo-Greek word formed from the Greek words "dipsa" = "thirst" and "mania" = "madness; enthusiasm or inspired frenzy." It is first attested in the middle of the nineteenth century.


Dipsomaniac

"An Alcoholic." See "dipsomania."


Dipsophobia

"An Irrational Fear of Drinking." From the Greek "dipsa" = "thirst" and the suffix "-phobia." See other words starting with "dipso-" and also "-phobia."


Dipstick

"Rod for Checking Fluid Levels; Idiot, Dope; Stupid." "Dipstick" simply means "a stick that is dipped into liquids." The pejorative form, meaning "idiot" is a substitution for the less polite "dipshit." Like "dipshit," it also takes an adjective form. See "dipshit."


Dipsy

"Drunk; Foolish." An adjective formed from "dipso." Like "dip," it first meant merely "drunk" and later also came to mean "foolish as if drunk." See "dipso" and "dipsomaniac."


Dis, Diss

1. "Disrespect." [Cont.] For example: "Don't be dissin' my woman, homes!" or "Don't dis me like that." Sometimes it takes a subjunctive form, as a term for an insult.


Dis

2. "This." [DV]


Diva

"Pop Goddess (Singer)." From the Italian moniker for "opera singer." It ultimately derives from the Latin for "goddess."


Divvy, Divvie

"Divide." [Cont.] This is usually used in relation to profits (usually ill-gotten) and drugs.


DIY

"Do It Yourself." This acrostic expression was popularised by counterculture and gained further use in the world of internet abbreviations.


DL

"Download." An internet abbreviation.


Docetism

"The Belief that Jesus did not Die On the Cross, but was Substituted by a Disciple, or Merely Appeared to be Crucified." The name comes from the Greek name of a sect who believed in such a theory, the Doketai. Their name derives from the Greek word "dokeo" = "to seem."


Dog

"Screw, Have Sex With." This is a slang meaning, which comes from "doggy style," a sexual position.


Don'

"Don't." [Cont]


Do'n

"Doing." [Cont]


Donkey

"Ass, Equus Asinus." This word came into parlance in English when the Americans started using "ass" to mean "arse." A politer substitution had to be found. The etymology is uncertain, but it seems that the word derived from "duncan," which was a popular name for asses in the day. It suppossedly morphed to "dunkey," then to the modern "donkey." The word has come to take some of the meanings of "asinine."


Doo

"Hairdo." From Black Vernacular. See also "doo-rag."


Doo-Rag

"Bandana." From Black Vernacular. See "doo."


Dope

Dope has many meanings in American slang. It was supposedly first introduced to English from the Dutch "doop," meaning "sauce," Though I have not found this word in Dutch. It may be archaic. It is still sometimes used to denote "sauce" in certain regional dialects. It was later used to refer to any thick liquid. For instance, it was used to denote resin used to solidify airplane wings, etc. It was first used to denote drugs when it was used for heroin, which is injected as a thick liquid. It later came to mean any drug, or a drug user. The term "dopey" originally meant "stupid as if on drugs." Dope later aquired the meaning "cool" through its association with drugs. The meaning "knowledge," as in "the inside dope," comes from horse racing, and knowing which horses were doped up.


Dose

"Those." [DV]


Double Penetration

"When a Female is Fucked in the Ass and Vagina at the Same Time." Often simply "dp" as in "she got dp'd." The simply descriptive etymology of the phrase should need no further comments.


Double Whammy

See "whammy."


Dough

"Though." [DV] From Black Vernacular, for example "Ya don't hear me dough, so here I go..."


DP

"Double Penetration." See "double penetration." For instance "She got dp'd in the last scene."


DPI

"Dots Per Inch." An abbreviation used to signify resolution in digital images. Monitors, for instance, normally display 72 dpi, or 72 dots per inch.


DR

1. "Dining Room." Common in real estate ad terminology.


DR

2. "Door." Common in automotive ad terminology.


Drat

A general exclaimant, but a true curse word. This originally comes from the curse "God rot you."


DTRT

"Do The Right Thing." An internet abbreviation.


Duckets, Ducats

"Money." This is popular in Black Vernacular, as in the term "clocking duckets" = "making money." "Ducket" is corrupted from "ducat," from the French coin of that name.


Dumb

"Stupid." Dumb comes straight down unchanged from Anglo-Saxon, where it meant both "stupid" and "silent." It came to Anglo-Saxon from either Old Saxon or Old Frisian, which both use the "dumb" form. It is a Germanic root, existing in German as "dumm," Middle High German as "tump," "tumbe" or "tum," Old High German as "tumm," "tump," "dumb" or "dump," Danish as "dum," Dutch as "dom," Old Norse as "dumbr" and Gothic as "dumbs."


Dung

1. "Excrement, Manure." This word comes straight from Anglo-Saxon unchanged, though there have been a few variants and spin-offs along the way. Another form found in Anglo-Saxon is "dyncge." Middle English had "donge," "dounge," "dinge," "ding" and "dunge" as well as "dung." It is found throughout the Germanic spectrum. We see it in Old Saxon, Old Frisian and New High German as "dung," Middle Dutch as "dünge," Middle High German as "tunge," Old High German as "tung," Swedish as "dynga," Norwegian and Danish as "dynge" and Old Norse as "dyngja." It should be noted, however, that certain of the Scandinavian manifestations of the word take on the specified meaning of "dung-heap." The words for "dung," in Norwegian, for instance, are "gjødsel" and "møkk." "Møkk," incidentally, is cognate to our modern "muck."


Dung

2. "To Fertilize With Manure." From the Middle English "dungen." The only known form of the word in Anglo-Saxon is "dyngen," but given the forms "dyncge" and "dung" existing side by side in Anglo-Saxon, it seems quite possible that "dungen" existed as well. The word has many Germanic cognates, such as the German "dungen" and the Swedish "dynga." It is interesting to note that, like the modern "dung," the Swedish does not change between substantif and verbal form.


Dungy

"Composed Of, Mixed With, or Resembling Dung." From "dung" 1.


Dunno

"Don't Know." [Cont]


DWB

"Don't Write Back." An internet abbreviation.


Dwella

"Dweller." From Black Vernacular, for example: the groups "the Dwellas" and "Cella Dwellas."


Dyme

1. "Dime," as in "on the dyme." From Black Vernacular.


Dyme

2. "Dime, 'Perfect 10'." From Black Vernacular, for example, a letter in XXL reads "You look beautiful with your clothes on, a dyme for real." See "dime" 2.





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