A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



Eachwhere

"Everywhere." An archaic form from Middle English. It combines "each" and "where."


Earl

"To Vomit; Vomit." A corruption of "hurl."


Earlin'

"Vomiting." See "earl."


Earmark

"To Reserve Something For a Specific Purpose." Literally, "to mark the ear" after the practice of marking sheep's ears to signify ownership.


Ebon

"Made of Ebony." See "ebony."


Ebonics

"Black Vernacular Speech." A combination of "ebony," implying "black" and "phonics," meaning "sounds."


Ebonize

"To Blacken, Make Black." From ebony wood, which is often black in colour. See "ebony." See "-ize."


Ebony

"A Species of Tree; Made of Ebony Wood." The name ultimately derives from the Hebrew word "ebon" (ABN), meaning "stone," after the hardness of it's wood. We can trace it back through the Middle English "eban," Latin "ebenus," and Greek "ebonos."


Ebriate

"Intoxicated." From the Latin "ebriatus," past participle of "ebriare" = "to make drunk."


Ebriety

"Drunkenness, Intoxication." From the Latin "ebrius" = "drunk, intoxicated."


Ebriose

"Intoxicated." From the Latin "ebrius" = "drunk, intoxicated."


Ebriosity

"Habitual Drunkenness." From the French "ebriosité," from the Latin "ebriosus" = "habitual drunkenness."


Ebrious

"Inclined to Drunkenness."


Ecclesia

"Church." Medieval Latin, from the Greek "ekklêsia" = "church." Before Christianity, "ekklêsia" generally meant an "assembly."


Ecclesial

- A variant of "ecclesiastical."


Ecclesiarch

"A Church Leader, A Ruler of the Church." From the Greek components "ekklêsia" (see ecclesia) and "archos" = "ruler, leader, chief."


Ecclesiarchy

"Church Rule, Government by Church Authority." Etymology identical to the previous entry.


Ecclesiast

"A Preacher, One Who Participates in the Ecclesia." From the French "ecclesiaste," from the Latin "ecclesiastes," from the Greek "ekklêsiastês," all of the same meaning. See also "ecclesia."


Ecclesiastic

"Of or Pertaining to the Church." From the Greek "ekklêsiastikos" of the same meaning. See "ecclesia" and "-ic."


Ecclesiastical

"Of or Pertaining to the Church." See "ecclesiastic."


Ecclesiography

"A Descriptive Treatise on a Church." See "ecclesia" and "-graphy."


Ecclesiolatry

"Worship of the Church, Church Forms and Church Traditions." From the Greek components "ekklêsia" (see ecclesia) and "latreia" = "service to the gods, divine worship."


Ecclesiology

"The Science of Church Building and Decoration; A Branch of Theology Concerned with the Nature, Constitution and Function of the Church." See "ecclesia" and "-ology."


Ecclesiophobia

"An Irrational Fear of Churches." See "ecclesia" and "-phobia."


Eccoprotic

"Mildly Purgative." From the Greek "ekkoprotikos" = "promoting discharge of excrement." See also "copro-."


Ecdysiast

"Stripper, Striptease." From the Greek "ekdusis" = "strpping, deprivation."


Ecdysis

"Molting or Shedding of Outer Skin." From the Greek "ekdusis" = "stripping, deprivation."


Echo

"The Repetition of Sound Due to It Bouncing off Hard Surfaces." This comes unchanged from Latin through Old French and Middle English. Latin derived it from the Greek "êchô" = "echo, ringing noise."


Echolalia

"Mimiking Speech; Repetitious Speech, as of a Youngster." From the Greek components "êchô" (See "echo") and "laleo" = "talk, chatter, prattle."


Ecstasied

"Enraptured." See "ecstasy."


Ecstasize

"To Throw Into Ecstasy, Enrapture." See "ecstasy" and "-ize."


Ecstasy

"Intense Joy or Delight; Rapture; A State of Emotion or Fear where the Mind is Driven from Rational Thought and Self-Control; Mystic or Spiritual Trance; The Drug MDMA." There is also a verb form, though it is rare, "to Enrapture, to Throw Into a High State of Feeling, to Throw into a State of Frenzy or Stupor." The first given substantive definition is a recent development of the word from about the 17th century. In the original sense of the word, pleasure was not neccessarily implied, as can be seen in such archaic phrases as "the ecstasy of rage." The word comes down through various spellings in Middle English (many with an ex- spelling). It comes to English from the Old French "extasie." It survives in French today as "exstase." Romanian has the word as "extaz," Spanish as "extasis," Portugese as "extase," Catalan as "extasi," Italian as "estasi," etc. All these Romance forms came from the Late Latin "exstasis" and Ecclesiastical Latin "exstasis." These Latin and Romance forms all have the general meaning of "ecstasy" as rapture, trance or bewilderment. The Latin can be traced back further to the Greek "ekstasis," meaning either 1. displacement; change; degeneracy or movement outwards or 2. standing aside, distraction of mind from either terror, fear, anger or astonishment; entrancement; drunken excitement. The Latin forms obviously developed out of the secondary set of definitions. In Greek, we also find "ekstatikos," meaning excitable; out of one's senses; or causing mental derangement. This is the root of our "ecstatic." See also "extasy."


Ecstatic

"In a State of Ecstacy or Rapture; Driven from Rational Thought by Emotion; Of the State of Ecstasy; Subject to Trance or Catalepsy." From the Old French "extatique." See "ecstasy" and "-ic."


Ecstatical

"Ravished; Rapturous." See "ecstasy."


Eejit

"Idiot." From the British and Irish dialectical pronunciation. See "idiot."


Eff, F

"Fuck." A politer substitution. For example, "Eff the bitch!" See "effing."


Effable

- 1. "Capable of Being Spoken Aloud; Explainable in Words." Not as common as its antonym "ineffable." French, from the Latin "effabilis" from "efari" = "to speak out."


Effable, F-able

- 2. "Fuckable." A slightly politer substitution. See "eff."


Effing, F-ing

"Fucking." A politer substitution. See "eff."


Egad, Egads, Igad

- General Exclaimation. An alteration of "oh God."


Egg

- 1. "The Female Gamete." Until recently, the word refered specifically to a bird's egg. This root word is common Germanic. The English "egg" derived from Middle English forms "egg," "egge" and "eg," from the Old Norse "egg." Anglo-Saxon, as all other Germanic tongues, had a version of the word, but it lost out to the Old Norse.


Egg

- 2. "Young Person." From "egg" 1. This survives in the expressions "he/she is a good egg" or the converse "bad egg."


Egg

- 3. "Provoke." As in, to "egg someone on." This can be traced back to the Middle English "eggen" = "to incite." It is related to other Middle English words, like "eggement" = "incitement" and "eggunge" = "instigation." These are all thought to derive from the Old Norse "eggia" = "to urge, goad, incite."


Ejaculate

"To Eject or Discharge Suddenly, Particularly of Semen in Orgasm or Sudden Words of Speech." From the Latin "eiaculari" = "to shoot forth," from "iacto" = "to toss, throw, fling." See also "jack off."


Ejaculation

"A Sudden Spurting Forth, Particularly of Semen in Orgasm or Sudden Words of Speech; Ejected Seminal Fluid." See "ejaculate."


Ejaculatory

"Pertaining to Ejaculation, Seminal or Verbal." See "ejaculate."


Eject

"To Throw Out; Compel to Leave, Evict; Make an Emergency Exit." From the Middle English "ejecten," from the Latin root "eiect" = "casting out" from "iacto" = "to toss, throw, fling."


Ejecta

"That Which is Ejected, Ejected Matter." From the Late Latin "eiecta," neuter plural of "eiectus." See "eject."


Ejection

"The Act of Ejecting; Ejected Matter, Ejecta." See "eject."


Em

"Them; Him." [Cont.] As in the rap song "Shut Em Down."


Emcee

"M.C.," as either a noun or a verb. From the acronym of "master of ceremonies."


Emesis

"The Act of Vomiting." A good Greek word.


Emet

"Emetophobe." [Cont] See "emetophobia."


Emetic

"Causing Vomit; a Substance That Induces Vomiting." From the Greek "emetikos" = "provoking vomiting."


Emetology

"The Study of Vomiting." From the Greek root "emetos" = "vomiting" and the suffix "-ology" Se "-ology."


Emetophilia

"Arousal From Vomit or Vomiting." From the Greek root "emetos" = "vomiting" and the suffix "-philia." See "-philia."


Emetophobia

"An Irrational Fear of Vomit or Vomiting." From the Greek root "emetos" = "vomiting" and the suffix "-phobia." See "-phobia."


Emmen-, Emmeno-

"Menstrual." This takes the form of "emmeno-" before a consonant and "emmen-" before a vowel. It derives from the Greek "emmênios" = "monthly." (See "emmenia.) This formation into a combining form is modern and not attested in Greek.


Emmenagogue

"A Substance Which Accelerates Menstrual Flow." From "emmen-" (see "emmen-") and "agogue" from the Greek "agôgos" = "drawing forth."


Emmenia

"Menses, Menstruation." From the Greek "emmenios" = "monthly; menses," from "em" = "in" and "meniaios" = "monthly," from "mene" = "moon."


Emmenological

"Pertaining to Menstruation." See "emmenology," "-ic" and "-al." This word is based on a combination of the three components.


Emmenology

"The Study of Menstruation." From "emmen-" and the suffix "-ology." See "emmen-" and "-ology."


Emmenopathy

"Disordered or Faulty Menstruation." From "emmen-" (see "emmen-") and the Greek "pathos" = "state" or "condition."


Emoticon

"Symbols Used To Denote Expression in E-text by Approximating Facial Expression." By example, : ) represents a happy face, ; ) a wink, : ( a frown, etc. The word is a contraction of "emotive icon."


Endogamy

"The Custom of Marrying Within a Clan, Tribe, or Social Group." From the Greek "endon" = "within" and "gamos" = "marriage." See also "gamic" and "exogamy."


Ends

"Money." From the phrase "making ends meet," shortened to "Making ends," where "ends" took on a new meaning.


Endo

"High Grade Marijuana." Back dialectical pronunciation of "indoor," as in, "indoor grown."


Enoptromancy

"Divination by a Mirror." From the French "enoptromancie," from the Greek roots "enoptron" = "mirror" and "manteia" = "mode of divination."


Enta

"Enter." [DV] From Black Vernacular. See also "entaprizin'."


Entaprizin'

"Enterprizing." [DV] From Black Vernacular. See, for example, the song of that title by Big Daddy Kane.


Enuff

"Enough." [DV] From Black Vernacular. For example, there is the song "The World Ain't Enuff" by Tela.


EOD

"End Of Discussion." An internet abbreviation.


Eradicate

"To Pull Out By the Roots" literally or figuratively. From the Middle English "eradicaten," from the Latin eradico = "to pluck out by the roots, to root out," from e-, ex- and radix = "root." See also "root," "radical" and "radix"


Erot-, Eroto-

"Love." This takes the form of "eroto-" before a consonant and "erot-" before a vowel. It derives from the Greek "erôt-" and "erôto-," combining forms of "erôtikos" = "erotic." See "erotic."


Erotic

"Pertaining to Sexual Passion or Love." From the Greek "erôtikos" = "of or caused by love," from "erôs" = "love."


Erotica

"Literature Intended to Arouse Sexually." From the Greek "erôtika," the neuter plural of "erôtikos." See "erotic."


Eroticism

"An Erotic Quality or Theme; Sexual Arousal." See "erotic" and "-ism."


Eroticize

"To Make Erotic." See "erotic" and "-ize."


Erotism

- Variant of "eroticism." See "eroticism."


Erotize

- Variant of "eroticize." See "eroticize."


Erotology

"The Study or 'Science' of Love."


Erotomania

"Uncontrollable Sexual Passion; Madness Caused by Imaginary Love." From the Greek "erôtomania" = "raving love." It is a compound of "erôto-" (see "erot-.") and "mania" = "madness; enthusiasm or inspired frenzy." See also "erotic" and "-mania."


Erotophobia

- An Irrational Fear of Sexual Love or Sexual Questions." See "erot-" and "-phobia."


Etymologer

"One Who Studies Word Origins; An Etymologist." See "etymology."


Etymologicon

"An Etymological Word Book." From the Greek "etumologikon" of the same meaning. See "etymology."


Etymologist

"One Who Studies Word Origins; An Etymologer." See "etymology."


Etymologize

"To Trace a Word's Origins." From the Late Latin "etymologizare" of the same meaning. See "etymology."


Etymology

"The Study of Word Formation and Derivation." Middle English, from the Old French "ethimologie," from the Latin "etymologia," from the Greek "etumologia" all meaning the same. The Greek is formed from "etumos" = "true" or more specifically to this case, the "true origin of a word" and "logos." See "-ology." See also "etymon."


Etymon

"The Original or 'Seed' From of a Word that Others are Based Off." From the Greek "etumon," neuter of "etymos" = "true." See also "etymology."


Eva

"Ever." [DV] From Black Vernacular. It is often compounded, as in "whateva," and "foreva."


Evaginate

"To Unsheath; To Turn Inside Out." From the Latin "euaginato" = "drawing out (particularly of a sword)." See "vagina" and "invaginate."


Evaginated

"Unsheathed, Turned Inside Out." See "evagination."


Evagination

"The Action of Unsheathing or Turning Inside Out." See "evaginate" and "vagina."


Exc

"Excellent." A common abbreviation in sales ads.


Excremeditation

"Contemplating Something While Sitting on the Toilet." Combines the words "excrete" and "meditation."


Excrement

"That Which is Passed Out of the Body, Especially Feces." French from the Latin "excrementum." While we commonly use "excrement" to refer solely to feces, the Latin, and also properly the English word, refers to all bodily discharge, including phlegm and vomit, for instance. See "excrete."


Excremental

"Pertaining to Excrement." Also "excremential," "excrementitial," "excrementious," "excrementitious," "excrementous" and "excrementuous." See "excrement" and "-al."


Excremential

- A variant of "excremental."


Excrementitial

- A variant of "excremental."


Excrementious

- A variant of "excrementitious."


Excrementitious

"Pertaining to Excrement." See "excrement" and "excremental."


Excrementive

"Fit or Meant to Carry Off Waste." See "excrement."


Excrementize

"To Void Excrement, Defecate." See "excrement" and "-ize."


Excrementous

"Pertaining to Excrement." See "excrement" and "excremental."


Excrementuous

- A variant of "excrementous."


Excreta

"Excreted Matter, esp. Feces and Urine." From the same in Latin. See also "excrete."


Excrete

"To Separate or Expell from the System, Discharge." From the Latin "excretus," participle of "excerno" = "to sift out, separate."


Excretion

- 1. "The Act or Process of Discharging Waste." See "excrete."


Excretion

- 2. "Discharged Waste." See "excrete."


Excretive

"Promoting Excretion." See "excrete."


Excretory

"Having the Function of Excreting; Pertaining to Excreting." See "excrete."


Exogamy

"The Custom of Marrying Outside of One's Clan, Tribe, or Social Group." From the Greek "exo" = "without" and "gamos" = "marriage." See also "gamic" and "endogamy."


Exp

"Experience." A common abbreviation in help wanted ads.


Extacie

- Obsolete form of "ecstasy." See "ecstasy."


Extacy

- Obsolete form of "ecstasy." See "ecstasy." This spelling has seen some revival, particularly in drug culture.


Extasy

- Obsolete form of "ecstasy." See "ecstasy." This spelling has seen some revival, particularly in drug culture.


Extatic

- Obsolete form of "ecstatic." See "ecstatic" and "ecstasy."


E'ywhere

"Everywhere." [DV] From Black Vernacular.





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