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G

1. "Guy." From Black Vernacular. Supposedly, "G" designated a member of your gang, short for "gangsta," but it has changed to mean something more like "bud." "Yo G!" = "Yo Bud!" The original connotation can be seen in the phrase "Ain' nuthin but a G-thang!" Some maintain that this is actually of 5 percenter origin, meaning actually "God." It does not seem that anyone can say for certain.


G

2. "Grand, Money." [Cont] For instance, "20G" = Twenty Grand = $20,000. The term has been expanded to mean "money" in general, as in "I gots no g's, yo" = "I'm broke." See also "gees."


G

3. "Gram." Mostly from drug terminology.


<g>

"Grin." An internet abbreviation.


Gab

"to Chatter, Prattle, Talk Falsely, Talk Gosssip." This is often listed as slang, but it is from good Middle English. Various Middle English forms of the word include "gabbe" = "mockery, deceit," "gabben" = "to mock, reproach, accuse, tell lies, deceive," "gabbere" = "mocker, deceiver" and "gabbung" = "mockery." This is one Middle English word which came from neither Anglo-Saxon or Latin, but rather was derived from the Scandinavian tongues. Old West Sacndinavian forms include "gabb" = "mockery" and "gabba" = "to mock."


Gadzooks!

- A general exclaimant, going back to the mid seventeenth century. It is a corruption of "By God's hooks!" refering to the Crucifixion.


GAF

"Gay Asian Female." From single's ad terminology.


Gallis

"Gallows." A Southern Black variant. This can be seen in blues lyrics, such as Blind Lemon Jefferson's "Hangman's Blues," where he sings "I wanna tell you the gallis Lord's a fearful sight," and Leadbelly's "The Gallis Pole."


Gallophobia

"an Irrational Fear of French People and Things." The word is formed from "Gaul," the Latin word for France and the suffix "-phobia." See "-phobia."


Gam, Gamb

"Leg." Considered slang, but recorded by the OED back as far as 1781. The word probably derives the Italian "gamba" = "leg," but it might also derive from the heraldric term "gamb," refering to an animal leg. Both of these ultimately derive from the Late Latin "gamba." See "gamb" and "gam it."


GAM

"Gay Asian Male." From single's ad terminology.


Gamb, Gambe, Jamb

"An Image of an Animal Leg in Heraldry." This derives from the Old French "gambe," a derivation of the Late Latin "gamba" = "horses leg," derived in turn from the Greek "kampe" = "flexion, bend."


Gamic

"Pertaining to Marriage." In biology, it has the meaning "sexual," or "sexually reproducing." From the Greek "gamos" = "marriage." See also "agamic," "cryptogamic," "allogamy," "autogamous," "gamogenesis," "agamy," "gamomania," "gamophobia," "monogamy," "bigamy," "trigamy," "polygamy," "digamy," "deuterogamy," "endogamy" and "exogamy."


Gam It

"To Walk, Go by Foot, Run Away." From "gam." This dates back to some time in the 19th century. See "gam."


Gamogenesis

"Sexual Reproduction." From the Greek roots "gamos" = "marriage" and "genesis" = "beginning." See "gamic."


Gamomania

"Insanity Characterized by the Compulsion to Make Outlandish Marriage Proposals." Pseudo-Greek after the root words "gamos" = "marriage" and "mania" = "madness."


Gamophobia

"Fear of Marriage." From the Greek "gamos" = "marriage" and the suffix "-phobia." See "-phobia."


Ganga, Ganja

"Marijuana." Introduced into English through the Rasta borrowing of the Sanskrit term for marijuana. Ganga is the sacred river of India, it is seen as the river of life.


Gangsta

"Gangster." An Ebonic corruption, used not only to describe gang members, but also a genre of music and culture.


Ganja

- See "ganga."


Gank

"To Steal, Rip Off, Jack." This word was made popular by the N.W.A. song "I Ain't Tha 1," "...Ganked means getting took for your bank Or your gold or your money or something..." It's etymology is not known for certain as far as I can tell, but I speculate that it is related to "gang," developed from "ganged up on" or something similar to "ganged" and eventually "ganked." The g/k shift is well known, and it fits with the Black vernacular useage of such phrases as "gang-bangin'," etc..


Ganymede

"a Boy Used in Homosexual Relations." Eponymous from the mythological "Ganymede," a young boy who Zeus whisked away to Olympus as his young lover. See also "catamite."


Gat, Gatt

"Pistol, Machine Gun." Gat is short for "gatling gun," the first machine gun, from around the Civil War period, named after its inventor, Richard Jordan Gatling. It was first applied to Thompson sub-machine guns during the prohibition, then later to pistols. The term is popular in Black Vernacular, where it means only a "pistol" and sometimes takes the doubled final t.


Gawd

"God." Usually from the context of vain useage, as in "oh ma gawd, not again!".


GBF

"Gay Black Female." From single's ad terminology.


GBM

"Gay Black Male." From single's ad terminology.


G'day

- General Greeting. [Cont] A contraction of "Good Day." This seems to have started in Australia, but has spread elsewhere. Common as "G'day mate!"


G'd Up

"Dressed to Kill." [Cont] Short for "all geared up." From Black Vernacular. See "gear."


Getcha

"Get You," [Cont.][DV] As in "Can I getcha sump'n" = "Can I get you something" or "Im-a getcha one day" = "I am going to get you one day."


Gear

"Clothes, Shoes." Primarily from Black Vernacular, probably originally from sporting gear. See also "g'd up."


Gee

- A general exclaimant, as in "Well, gee, I never thought of that." This is actually a contraction of "Jesus," substituted to avoid vain use. Its usage seems to have started in the nineteenth century.


Gees

"Money." [Cont] See "g" - 2. Primarily from Black Vernacular.


Germanophobia

"an Irrational Fear of Germans and German Things." The name "German" was the Latin name for the "Germanic" tribes. See "-phobia."


Geto

"Ghetto." An Ebonic corruption seen in Rap titles and lyrics.


GF

"Girl Friend." An internet abbreviation.


GHF

"Gay Hispanic Female." From single's ad terminology.


GHM

"Gay Hispanic Male." From single's ad terminology.


Gibber

"to Chatter, Prattle, Talk Unintelligibly." Dictionaries generally list the etymology of this word as unknown and probably of imitative origin. While we cannot be certain, it seems more than probable that the word developed from "gab" or "gabber." See "gab."


Gibberish

"Chatter, Prattle, Unintelligible Speach." See "gibber."


GIF

"Graphic Interchange Format; a File in that Format." One of the more common types of graphic file systems. It was developed by Compuserve.


Gigolo

"Male Escort, Man Who Gets Money in Exchange for a Sexual Relationship." French masculine of "gigala" = "dance hall woman," which is related to "gigolette" = "prostitute."


Gimme

"Give Me." [Cont.]


Gip

"To Steal, Cheat, or Swindle." Also "gyp" and "jyp." Generally thought to be short for "Gypsy," from their reputation as swindlers and theives.


Git

"Get," [DV] Primarily from Black Vernacular, as in "I'm-a git me some" and "...tryin 2 git the correct..." See also "gittin" and "forgit."


Gittin

"Getting." Primarily from Black Vernacular, as in "...gittin my info..." There is a song by the artist "Kid 'n Play entitled "Gittin' Funky." See "git."


GL

"Good Luck." An internet abbreviation.


Glamer

An archaic version of "glamour," in its meanings of "spell" and "to cast a spell." See "glamoury."


Glamour, Glamor

1. "Compelling Charm, Alluring Beauty." From "glamoury." See "glamoury."


Glamour, Glamor

2. "To Use Charm or Magic Power to Influence Others." From "glamoury."


Glamour-Craft

"Spellcraft." See "glamoury."


Glamour-Gift

"A Natural Ability to Cast Enchantment." Literally the "gift of glamoury." See "glamoury."


Glamour-Might

"Magic Power." See "glamoury."


Glamourous, Glamorous

"Having a Compelling Charm or Glamour, Fascinating." Originally, "glamorous" meant "magical" in the Scottish dialect. See "glamoury."


Glamoury

"Spellcraft." A Scottish derivative of the Old French "gramaire," probably through the form "gramaire." See "gramarye," "grammar" and "glamour."


Glee

"A State of Exhaultation; Mirth, Joy, Rejoicing; Entertainment, Play; Jesting; A Musical Composition, Either Joyful or Sorrowful." From the various Middle English forms, including "glee," "gleu," "gleo," "glu" and "glew." When Chaucer used the word "glee," he meant "music" by it. The sense of "joy" developed around 1250 ce. or so. The verb form, "to glee" = "to make music" or "to make merry" developed from the Middle English form "to glew," from the Anglo-Saxon "glewian" = "to make music, make merry." The Anglo-Saxon forms of the substantif "glee" are also numerous, including "gleo," "gleow," "gliw" and "glig." The word is akin to the Old Norse "gly" = "joy, gaity," which is the parent of the Norwegian "gle" = "delight." Beyond the Norse connection, the word's etymological connections are debated. It is possibly related to the roots of "gleam," "glimmer" and also "glad."


Glee Club

"A Group of Singers." See "glee."


Glee Craft, Gleecraft

"The Art, Study or Knowledge of Music; Minstrelry." From the Middle English and Anglo-Saxon "gleocræ:ft" = "the art of music." See "glee" and "craft."


Gleeful

"Full of Exhuberant Joy." Literally, "full of glee." See "glee."


Gleeman

"A Minstrel, Singer." From various Middle English forms, including "gleman," "gleoman," "glewman" and "glemon." These forms all derive from the Anglo-Saxon "gleomann." See "glee."


Gleesome

An archaic form of "gleeful."


Glitch

"Technical Malfunction; Problem; A Spike in Power Voltage." While this started as a term from electronics, its meaning has spread to cover any "problem" or "snag." The term "glitch" most likely comes from Yiddish "glitsh" or "gletsch," meaning a slip or lapse, closely related to "glitshik," meaning "slippery." The Yiddish derives from the Middle High German "glitsen," the immediate parent of the New High German "gleiten," both words mean "to slide." Through its Germanic roots, "glitch" is a slightly distant relative of "glide," which comes from Anglo-Saxon.
The first recorded use of it was in 1962, in a book We Seven, by the astronaut John Glenn, who said "another term we adopted to describe some of our problems was glitch." He defined the term as "a spike or change in voltage in an electrical circuit which takes place when the circuit suddenly has a new load put on it...A glitch is such a minute change in voltage that no fuse could protect against it." Time Magazine, in 1965, popularized the term further with an article "Glitches a spaceman's word for irritating disturbances."
Note that John Glenn writes "adopted" not "invented." The term is common in electrical jargon. As John Glenn suggests, a glitch is generally a spike in voltage or a random voltage output caused by a change in power input. we can understand this as a "slide" by imagining a meter waving or sliding until the power level settles to what it should be. A secondary meaning of the term in electronics jargon is a temporary loss of power.
It is interesting, if not amusing, that a word originally meaning to slip or slide could come, in general useage, to mean "snag," which we would think of as opposite to "slide."


Glitchy

"Having Many Glitches, Snags or Bugs." See "glitch."


GMAB

"Give Me A Break." An internet abbreviation.


GMTA

"Great Minds Think Alike." An internet abbreviation.


Goetian

"A Sorcerer who Employs Spirits or Demons in Magic." A variant of a "goety" or "goetic." See "goety."


Goetic

"Pertaining to the Raising of Spirits or Demons; A Sorcerer who Employs Spirits or Demons in Magic." The French form is "goetique." See "goety."


Goetical

"Pertaining to the Raising of Spirits or Demons." A variant of "goetic." See "goety" and "goetic."


Goety

"Magic Involving the Employment of Evil Spirits or Demons; A Sorcerer who Employs Spirits or Demons in Magic." This word is generally archaic. It was sometimes misspelled "geoty" in a confusion of etymology, were some believed it to be from "geo" = "earth." In Early Modern English, "goety" was often contrasted against "magia," seen as "white magik." It could also be seen as opposite of "theurgy." English derives the word from the French "goetie." The word still exists in French, though it is generally marked "rare" in dictionaries. "Goetie" is also the proper German spelling. As with most words English derives from French, the word comes from Greek through Latin. The Latin form is "goetia," meaning "black magic." The primary word in Greek is "goetiea," meaning "witchcraft, jugglery," from "goes," meaning a "sorcerer, wizard" or a "juggler, cheat." Other Greek forms of the word are "goeteuma" = "a spell or charm," "goeteusis" = "sorcery," "goeteutikos" = "sorceress," "goetiuo" = "to bewitch, fascinate" and "goetis" = "bewitching, fascinating." The root of all these is generally the idea of "howling" or "murmering." This can be seen in the related words "goes" = "wailer," "goos" = "weeping, wailing," "goao" = "to groan, weep," "gongustes" = "mutter, mumble," and even "goi goi," the sound of pigs grunting. Exactly where the word came to mean specifically dealing with evil spirits is either in the French or in English.


Gon'

"Gonna, Going To." [Cont.] For example: "I's gon' get my nine."


Gonads

"a Gamete Producing Organ, Particularly the Testicles and Ovaries." From the same in Late Latin, from the Greek root "goneia" = "generative." A distant relative of "genital" and "generation."


Gonna

"Going to." [Cont.] See "gon.''


Gor Blimey

- General Expletive. Primarily British use. Derived from "God blind me" or "God blight me," depening on who you ask. It is also seen as "Cor blimey" or just "blimey."


Gospel

"The Christian Revelation; Pertaining to Christian Teaching." From the Anglo-Saxon "godspel" = "the good word," denoting the four Gospels of the New Testament. See the variant forms of the Anglo-Saxon word "spell" under "spell" 1.


Gots, Gotz, Gotst

"Got." [DV] From Black Vernacular. For example: "I gotst da goods," or "I gots mines," and "i gotz nuthin." Then there is EPMD's "You Gots to Chill." As "gotst," it sounds something like the German letzt.


Gotta

"Have Got To." [Cont.] Particularly Southern, as in "We gotta git..."


-gram

"Something Written." From the Greek "-gramma," from "gramma" = "letter."


Gramarye

"Occult Learning." In the 14th to 15th Centuries, the word also meant "grammar," being an early form of the word. From the Middle English "gramaire," from the Old French "gramaire" = "grammar" or "book of occult knowledge." See "grammar" and also "grimoire" and "glamoury."


Grammates

"The Rudiments of a Subject." From the Greek "grammatikos" = "of the letters."


Grammatolatry

"The Worship of Letters, Worship of Written Scriptures, Bibliolatry." From the Greek roots "grammatikos" = "of letters" and "latreia" = "service to the gods, divine worship."


Grammar

"The Study of How Words and Their Component Parts Combine to Form Sentences; A Book Dedicated to Grammatical Principles." From the Middle English "gramere," from the Old French "gramaire" = "grammar," from the Latin "grammatica," from the Greek "grammatike," feminine of "grammatikos" = "of letters." Originally, the term refered mostly to the learning of Latin and Greek, which were taught grammatically, as oppossed to the vulgar tongues. The term "gramaire," in Old French, also had connotations of occult learning, due to the suspicion cast on such learning. See also "gramarye."


Grammarian

"A Specialist in Grammar." From the Middle English "gramarian," from the Old French "gramarien." See "grammar."


Grammatical

"Relating to the Rulkes of Grammar; Obeying the Rules of Grammar." From the Late Latin "grammaticus," from the Greek "grammatikos" = "of letters."


Grammatist

"A Grammarian." Used disparagingly of those who hold to proper English grammatical construction. See "grammatic" and "grammarian."


Grammatology

"The Study of Letters and Scripts." From the Greek "grammatikos" = "of letters" and the suffix "-ology." See "-ology."


Grimoire

"A Book of Spells." French, from the Old French "gramaire." See "grammar."


Graphology

- "the Study of Handwriting." From the Greek root "graphe" = "letter, representation by means of lines," and the suffix "-ology." See "-ology."


Grapholagnia

"Maniacal Interest in Obscene Pictures." From the Greek roots "graphe" = "picture, drawing" and "lagneia" = "coition, intercourse."


Graphomania

"a Pathological Desire to Write." From the Greek roots "graphe" = "letter" and "mania" = "madness; enthusiasm or inspired frenzy."


-graphy

"a Writing About Something (as in 'biography'); Representation Produced in a Specific Manner (as in 'photography')." From the Greek root "graphe" = "letter, representation by means of lines, picture, drawing."


Greasy Spoon

"A Cheap, Dirty Restaraunt." After the tendency of such places to have bad dishwashing, hence, greasy plates, glasses and utensils.


Greek

"Anal Sex." As seen in "services" ads: "Greek available." The term goes deeper than just the sex ads and brothels, however. J.P. Chaplin's Dictionary of Psychology, for instance, lists "Greek love" as "homosexuality among males." The term comes from the prevalence of homosexuality (especially towards young boys) in ancient Greece.


Gringo

"Non Hispanic Person." This is a corruption of the Spanish word "griego" = "Greek." The term was originally applied to the speech of foriegners, just as we say "Its all Greek to me," and was latter applied to the foriegners themselves.


Grok

"to Understand, Completely Comprehend." This word went from science fiction into the parlance of sci-fi types and hippies, through to general slang. It was coined by Robert Heinlen, in his book Stranger in a Strange Land (1961). Sometimes it appears as "grokk."


Grope

"to Reach About Uncertainly; to Feel One's Way About; to Fondle Someone's Genitals; an Act or Instance of Groping." From the Anglo Saxon "grapian" = "to feel for, lay hold of, seize, touch" through various Middle English forms. When exactly the sexual connotations of the word developed is uncertain. A close relative of "grip," "grab" and "grasp."


Gruv

"Groove." [DV] From Black Vernacular. For example, there is "Nu Gruv" records.


Gurge

"Vomit." [Cont] A slang contraction of "regurgitate."


Gurl

"Girl." This mutation shows up in many dialects, as seen on an e-list "this gurl ive known."


Gwan, Gwaan

"Go On." [Cont.]This is particularly Jamaican, as in "Gwan, bun the fire" and "...touring haffi gwaan..." = "Touring has to go on."


GWF

"Gay White Female." From single's ad terminology.


GWM

"Gay White Male." From single's ad terminology.


Gymnophobia

"an Irrational Fear of Nakedness." From the Greek "gumnos" = "nakedness" and the suffix "-phobia." See "-phobia."


Gynandromorph

"an Organism Having Both Male and Female Characteristics." From the Greek components "gune" = "female," "andro" = "man" and "morph" = "form."


Gynandry

"Hermaphrodism." From the Greek components "gune" = "female" and "andro" = "man"


Gynarchy

"Government by Women." From the Greek root "gune" = "female" and the suffix "-archy." See "-archy."


Gynecoid

"Characteristic of a Woman." From the Greek root "gune" = "female" and the suffix "-oid." See "-oid."


Gynecomastia

"the Abnormal Enlargement of Breasts in a Male." From the Greek root "gune" = "female" and the Greek "mastos" = "woman's breast."


Gynocentric

"From a Female Point of View." From the Greek root "gune" = "female" + "-centric." (antonym = phallocentric. One is left to wonder why "phallocentric is listed in the A.H.D., but not "gynocentric.")


Gynococracy

"Government by Women; a Society Governed by Women." From the Greek root "gune" = "female" and the suffix "-cracy." See "-cracy."


Gynocracy

"Government by Women; a Society Governed by Women." A variant of "gynococracy." See "gynococracy."


Gynophobia

"an Irrational Fear of Women." From the Greek root "gune" = "female" and the suffix "-phobia." See "-phobia."


Gyp

"To Steal, Cheat, or Swindle." Also "gip" and "jyp." Generally thought to be short for "Gypsy," from their reputation as swindlers and theives.





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