A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



Wanna, Wana

1. "Want A." [Cont] As in the site "Wana Buy Something?" and "Pollywanacraka." Far less common that use 2.


Wanna, Wana

2. "Want To." [Cont][DV] As in "I wanna git down!" and "...we wanna do what we wanna do when we wanna do it how we wanna do it," as somebody once said on an e-list.


Wansta

"Wants To." [Cont][DV] Primarily from Black Vernacular, as in "He really wansta know who you like" and "when she wansta get laid."


Wants

"Want." [DV] From Black Vernacular, as in "I wants ta eat now."


Wasp

"White Anglo-Saxon Protestant." An acronym of the definition. Generally derogatory. It also exists in the form "waspy" = "pertaining to wasp culture."


Wassup?

A variant of "whassup?"


WAYD

"What Are You Doing?" An internet abbreviation.


WB

"Welcome Back." An internet abbreviation.


WBS

"Write Back Soon." An internet abbreviation.


WD, W/D

"Washer and Dryer Included." Common in real estate ad terminology.


WDYMBT

"What Do You Mean By That?" An internet abbreviation.


Welp

"Well." [DV] A common variant, seen in contexts such as "welp, it'll be a while..."


Wench

1. "A Young Maiden; Woman of Loose Morals." From the Middle English "wenche" and the earlier "wenchel," from the Anglo-Saxon "wencel" = "child."


Wench

2. "To Consort With or Engage in Sex with Wanton Women." From the secondary meaning of "wench" 1.


Werewolf

"A Lycanthrope, A Mythical Human Who Can Take the Form of a Wolf, or was Changed into a Wolf; (Psychology = Zoanthrope) A Person Who Believes They are a Wolf." Like "wolf" (See "wolf" 1.), this word has come down almost unchanged from the Anglo-Saxon "werewulf," which literally means "man-wolf." The word also appears in English as "werwolf," which is the same as it is spelled in New High and Middle High German. There is a Scotts Doric version spelled "warwolf." The word exists throughout most of the Germanic spectrum, such as the Middle Dutch "weerwolf" and the Norwegian "varulv." The "were" component means simply "man" and is cognate to the Latin "vir" = "man." It was once a common Germanic word, existing in Old High German, Old Frisian and Old Saxon as well as Anglo-Saxon as "wer," in Old Norse as "verr" and the Gothic "wair." It also corresponds to the Old Irish "fer." See also "lycanthropy."


Werwolf

A variant of "werewolf."


We's

See "we'z."


Wet Blanket

"Party Pooper, Spoilsport." From the use of a wet blanket in putting out fires.


Weez

"We." [DV] From Black Vernacular, as in "so fucked up weez had to lock his ass up" and "Weez gots ourselves some..."


We'z, We's

"We Is," [DV][Cont] A contraction of the Black Vernacular grammatical construction "we is" = "we are," as in "We'z goin' now."


WF

"White Female." From single's ad terminology.


Whaddup?

A variant of "whassup?"


Whaddya'

"What Do You." [DV][Cont]


Whadeva

"Whatever." [DV][Cont] From Black Vernacular. See "eva" and "whateva."


Whammy

"Curse, Magic Spell." this occurs popularly in the phrase "put the whammy on someone." It comes from "wham," an onomatopoetic word for "strike, blow, or the sound of such." Both terms are only attested after the beginning of the twentieth century. "Wham" first occurs in the twenties, "whammy" in the forties. The term "double whammy" comes from the comic "Li'l Abner," where a character describes his evil eye curses as the "single whammy" (a one eyed curse) and the "double whammy" (a curse with the full power of both eyes).


Whassup? Wassup? Wuzzup? Whuddup?

"What Is Up?" [DV][Cont] From Black Vernacular. See also "sup?"


Whatcha

"What Are You." [Cont][DV] As in "Whatcha do'n?" and "Whatcha wanna do, huh?" See "cha."


Whateva

"Whatever." [DV][Cont] From Black Vernacular. See "eva" and "whadeva."


Whatta

"What A." [Cont]


Whelp

"A Young Offspring of a Mammal; A Young Child." Middle English from the Anglo-Saxon "hwelp" of the same meaning. It is probably a relative of "wolf."


Whey

"Where." [DV] From Jamaican, as in "Whey we all read out..."


Whitchaway

"Which Way." [DV] From Black Vernacular, as in "Whitchaway you go'n?" = "Which way are you going?"


Whoe

"Whore." [DV] From Black Vernacular. Not nearly as common as "ho." See "ho."


Whore

"Adulterer; Prostitute; to Engage in Promiscuous Sexual Activity." This is a Germanic word, from the Middle English and Anglo-Saxon "hore." We see cognates in the Old Saxon and Frisian "hor," Gothic "hors," Old Norse "horr" and "hor," Swedish "Hora," Norwegian and Danish "hore," Nynorsk "hors," Dutch "hoer," Old High German "huor" and German "Hure." All of these words mean roughly "adulterer." Norwegian and Danish also have a form "hor" = "adultery, fornication." The "wh" spelling appeared in English around the 16th century. The germanic word is derived from an Indo-European root related to "love." It is the same root as the Sanskrit "kama," the Latin "carus," and the English words "caress" and "cherish." See also "ho."


Whoredom

"Prostitution." From the Middle English "hordom." It is also related to the Old Norse "Hordomr." See "whore."


Whorehouse

"Brothel, Bordello." See "whore." Note also the German cognate "Hurenhaus" and the Norwegian "horehus."


Whoremaster

"Pimp, Pander, Mack; Whoremonger." See "whore" and "whoremaster."


Whoremonger

"One Who Regularly Consorts with Whores." See "whore" and "monger."


Whoreson

"Bastard." From the Middle English "hore's son." Note also the German "Hurensohn." This is an archaic pejorative. It was often used in the same way we use "bastard" today, without reference to anyone's parentage. It also existed in an adjective form meaning "vile, detestable." See "whore."


Whoring

"Participating in Promiscuous or Illicit Sexual Activity." See "whore."


Whorish

"Lewd." See "whore."


Whory

"Whorish." An archaic form. See "whorish" and "whore."


Whse

"Warehouse." Common in real estate ad terminology. See also "hse."


Whuffo'?

"What For?" [DV][Cont] Typically Southern.


Whut

"What." [DV] A Southern variant, as seen in Lil' Abner "Whut'll happen t' yo'?" This variant has become popular in Black Vernacular.


Wid

"With." [DV] From Black Vernacular. For example "Sick Wid It." See also "wit."


Widda

"With A." [DV][Cont] From Black Vernacular. See "wid" and "a."


Widdout

"Without." [DV] As in, "He then tells us we can't go backstage widdout a pass" and "suddenly so widdout rhyme widdout reason," both collected off the web.


Wif

"With." [DV] From Black Vernacular. For example, "...playing wif her pussy..." and "gettin' down wif yo bad self."


Wife

"Woman, Female Married Partner." The older forms of "wife" mean not specifically a married woman but any woman in general, though they can take on the "bride" connotation, as can the modern "woman," in such phrases as "my woman." Note the German cognate "Weib" = "woman." Wife derives from the Middle English forms "wif" and "wyf." These in turn derive from the Anglo-Saxon "wif," meaning "woman." It can be seen in such Anglo-Saxon compounds as "wifcild" = "female child" and "wifcynn" = "womankind." See also "woman."


Whiff-Bitch

"Coke Whore, One Who Has Sex for Cocaine." From the action of snorting as "whiffing," as in the old cocaine song "Honey Take a Whiff on Me."


Wigger, Wigga

"White Nigger." [Cont] This term denotes someone who is White but acts, dresses, or talks as if they were Black. Popular in Black and White parlance, though "wigga" is the preferred in Black and "wigger" in white parlance. See also "chigger," "jigger" and "korigger."


Wilco

"Will Comply." [Cont] Two-way radio slang.


Wit

"With." [DV]


Witch

"Sorceress, Sorcerer." This is attested in many Middle English forms, such as "witche," "wiche," "wichche" and "wicche." These all derive from the Anglo-Saxon "wicca" (masc.) and "wicce" (fem). The ulitmate etymology of "witch/wicca" is still up to debate, though it seems probable that it is derived from the same root as "vision" and "wise." The word may translate, then, as either "wise one" or more probably as "seer." The two meanings are inseparable in Indo-European.


Witcha

"With You." [Cont][DV] See "wit" and "cha."


Witchall

"With You All." [Cont][DV] See "wit" and "chall."


Witchcraft

"Sorcery." This derives from the Middle English "wicchecreft," which derives from the Anglo-Saxon forms "wiccecr¾ft" and "wiccr¾ft." See "witch."


Witching

"Spellcasting." This derives from the Middle English "wicching," which in turn comes from the Anglo-Saxon "wiccung." See "witch."


Witchu

"With You." [Cont][DV] See "wit" and "chu."


Wittol

"One Who Knows and Tolerates His Wife's Infidelities, a Witting Cuckold." Basically, this word etymologically derives from the ancestor of "witting cuckold," combining the Middle English "wete" with "cokewold" to create "wetewold," the anscestor of our modern "wittol." The word also became a term of abuse, meaning "half-wit." See "cuckold."


Wive

"To Marry a Woman; To Provide One With a Wife." Derived from the Middle English "wiven" which in turn derives from the Anglo-Saxon "wifian" both meaning "to take a wife." See "wife."


Wize

"Wise." [DV] From Black Vernacular. Also seen in combining forms such as "uthawize" = "otherwise."


Wk

"Week." A very common abbreviation.


Wknds

"Weekends." A very common abbreviation.


WM

"White Male." From single's ad terminology.


Wolf (pl. Wolves)

1. "A Canis Lupus." Wolf is unchanged from its Middle English form, but it existed in Anglo-Saxon and Old Saxon as "wulf." The word is Indo-European, and runs the whole Germanic spectrum in relatively the same form. High German had "Wolf" through all timeperiods, as did Dutch and Frisian. Danish, Swedish and Norwegian all have "ulv." Faroese has "ulver" and Old Norse had "ulvr." Gothic had "ulfa." The Baltic and Slavic tongues also had similar forms, but the f sound is replaced with a k. Note that the initial w, in German, is pronounced as a "v." Lithuanian has "vilkas" while Lettish has "vilks." Old Church Slavonic had "vluku." Polish has "vilk," etc. Noting this shift to a k sound makes it easier to see the relation to the Greek "lukos." This connects further to the Latin "lupus," where we return to the f/p phoneme. The Latin form, of course, gives us the Italian "lupo," the Spanish "lobo," the French "loup" and the Romanian "lup." See also "lupine," "lycanthropy" and "werewolf."


Wolf

2. "A Person Regarded as Predatory and Rapacious." This meaning goes back to Anglo-Saxon. It is often extended to mean someone who is sexually predatory, or that gives unwanted sexual attention to women. In the beginning of the twentieth century we see it applied to aggressive homosexuals. From "wolf" 1.


Wolf

3. "To Eat Rapaciously." From the rapaceous appetite attributed to wolves. This meaning goes back to at least the mid nineteenth century. See "wolf" 1.


Woman

"Female Human." Derives from the Middle English forms "wumman," "wimmon," and "wifmon." These all derive from the Anglo-Saxon "wifmann." All of these forms translate as "woman." The Anglo-Saxon "wifmann" is a composite of "wif" = "woman," the root of "wife," and "mann" = "person." "Mann" is not in this case specificaly masculine, but used as "human." "Wife" did not specifically mean a married woman, like the related German "Weib," but any woman. We can therefore literally translate "woman" as "female person."


Wonna

"Want To." [DV][Cont] From Black Vernacular. A compound of "want" and "ta." See "ta."


Wort

"Plant." Wort derives from the Anglo-Saxon wyrt = "root plant," extended to mean herb, vegetable, plant, spice." Its usage sense can be seen in the variant forms wyrtcynn = "the vegetable world," wyrtgeard = "kitchen garden," wyrtian = "to season, spice, perfume" and wyrtweard = "gardener." Wyrt allegedly derives from the zero grade form of the PIE root *wrad, meaning "root." It can also be seen in the Gothic waurts and the German waurzel, both = "root." In its regular form, the same root can be seen behind the word "root" itself, as well as the Old Norse rot = "root" and the Latin radix = "root." See also "root," "radix" and "radical."

Wyrt developed into the Middle English forms "wurt" and "wort" with the meaning shifting to "medicinal herb, pot-herb," resulting in the name being mostly applied in modern usage to plants used as medicines or intoxicants. It can be seen in such plant-names as "St. John's wort" = Hypericum perforatum, "mugwort" (originally AS mucgwyrt) = Artemisia, "liverwort" (thought to cure diseases of the liver), etc..


Woulda'

"Would Have." [Cont] As in "I woulda' if I coulda.'"


Wrnty

"Warranty." A common abbreviation in sales ads.


W/S

"Urolagnia." Abbreviated from "water sports."


WTF

"What The Fuck." An internet abbreviation.


WTG

"Way To Go." An internet abbreviation.


WTH

"What The Hell/Heck?" An internet abbreviation.


Wud

"Would." [DV] A spelling primarily used in Black Vernacular, as in "It wud give you..."


Wudda

"Would Have." [Cont][DV] As in "Shudda, Cudda, Wudda" and "Who wudda thunk it?"


Wuffo

"What For?" [Cont]


Wunder

"Wonder." [DV] As in "Wunder who dat wuz??" "Here's the wunder ofitall" and "but i wuz wunder'n if it'z..."


Wundrin

"Wondering." [DV] As in "I was wundrin if this was hopeless," "no. i was just wundrin if we'd have, you know, puh-rivacy" and "I've been wundrin bout you for a while."


Wuz

"What's, What Is." [Cont] Sometimes compouded into "Wuzzup?" = "What Is Up?"


Wuzzup?

A variant of "whassup?" See also "wuz."


WYP

"What's Your Point?" An internet abbreviation.


WYSIWYG

"What You See Is What You Get." An internet abbreviation.





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